Ohio University Board Of Trustees To Discuss Fiscal Year 2022 Plans

Presented By McDonald’s, I’m Lovin’ It!

(ATHENS) – The Ohio University Board of Trustees will receive an update on the University’s academic planning strategy, One OHIO initiative, and diversity and inclusion plans during its April meetings.

The Board will also consider capital projects and receive a budget update during the meetings, which will be held April 8th-9th. In addition, President M. Duane Nellis will provide an update on spring commencement, plans for the summer and fall semesters, and the University’s continued response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The meetings will be held from 8 a.m. until 4:15 p.m. April 8 and 8 a.m. until 12:45 p.m. April 9 and will be streamed online for media and public access. The meetings will be conducted online in accordance with Ohio House Bill 404, which allows for public meetings to be conducted in an online environment due to the COVID-19 pandemic through July 1, 2021.

Diversity and Inclusion strategic plan
Full board meeting, 11:15 a.m. Thursday, April 8

University leaders will review the Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan framework, which outlines OHIO’s core principles, strategic goals and action steps that will guide OHIO to an inclusive and equitable future.

The plan focuses on inclusive excellence, grounded in principles of equity, diversity, inclusion and anti-racism. Inclusive excellence promotes greater student achievement, faculty and staff satisfaction and retention, and lifelong ties between OHIO and its graduates. The document was developed since Spring 2019, including campus-wide conversations, feedback sessions with campus constituencies, and input from the Diversity and Inclusion Advisory Council and Diversity Leadership Institutes.

Academic Planning and Strategy
Full board meeting, 12:15 p.m. Thursday, April 8

Executive Vice President and Provost Elizabeth Sayrs will provide an update on the integrated priorities and timeline for the University’s academic planning and strategy initiative. The presentation will include recommendations to strengthen and refocus Ohio University’s academic core as identified by the Academic Planning and Strategy Group, which has been meeting since November 2020 and comprises 36 faculty and Deans’ Council representatives.

During the presentation, Provost Sayrs also will share recommendations of the International Opportunities Think Tank, co-chaired by Purba Das, associate professor in communication studies at OHIO’s Southern Campus, and chair of the University International Council, and Donal Skinner, Dean of the Honors Tutorial College, which was charged to explore, project, and make recommendations for the future of international teaching, learning, research, recruitment, and student support services. 

One OHIO update
Full board meeting, 12:15 p.m. Thursday, April 8

University leaders will update the Trustees on the status of the One OHIO integration plan. In addition to reviewing accomplishments and positive outcomes, including the creation of administrative and instructional efficiencies and the introduction of new leadership for each regional campus to foster an inclusive campus culture and to cultivate community relationships, the Trustees will have the opportunity to discuss emerging opportunities on our regional campuses as they align with future planning efforts. 

Marketing/enrollment update
Full board meeting, 12:15 p.m. Thursday, April 8

Trustees will receive an update on University enrollment projections, including a discussion about the impact of COVID-19 on enrollment, preliminary Spring 2021 highlights and Fall 2021 projections. University leadership will provide a comprehensive overview of active efforts to recruit and retain students, including multiple new visit strategies, such as expansion of COVID-safe in person campus visits through the new “OHIO Pawprint Tour.”

Vice President Candace Boeninger will brief the Trustees on work of the Strategic Enrollment Executive Committee (SEEC) to engage in strategic enrollment planning exercises that will respond to, reflect, and align with other key strategic initiatives.

Vice President Robin Oliver will update Trustees on expanded marketing strategies, such as an increase in targeted yield marketing, a new online undergraduate recruitment campaign, and an investment in layered digital advertising strategies.  

Budget update
Full board meeting, 12:15 p.m. Thursday, April 8

Trustees will receive an updated FY21 financial forecast, including the impact of COVID-19 on the projected year-end results, while transitioning the discussion to dynamic budget planning for FY22. Senior Vice President Deborah J. Shaffer will provide an update on state operating support, net tuition and fees, federal and state stimulus support, and institutional operating expenses. In addition to discussion about current FY22-FY26 budget assumptions and financial trends and evolving information that will impact these assumptions, University leaders will share a new interactive tool that has been developed within the University Budget Office that enables respective scenario analyses and the impacts on future year budgets.

Space planning initiative
Full board meeting, 12:15 p.m. Thursday, April 8

University leaders will update Trustees on OHIO’s space planning initiative, which has been adapted to meet evolving team and University needs for increased flexibility, optimization of collaborative work while respecting the need for focused individual efforts, and seamless integration of OHIO’s virtual and physical environments. Leveraging early adopters and building on lessons learned during the COVID-19 pandemic, the Flexible Workplace project will develop sustainable workplace models that can be readily scaled across the OHIO system to increase employee engagement, retention, and productivity; use campus space more effectively and realize expense reduction; and increase creative and serendipitous collaborations beyond typical networks. 

Academic health system presentation
Full board meeting, 12:15 p.m. Thursday, April 8

Kenneth Johnson, D.O., OHIO’s chief medical affairs officer and executive dean of the Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine, will discuss the College’s vision of a new “health systems” approach to medical education that formally integrates internal and external institutional partners. The goal is to operate as an academic health system that incorporates partners in a more strategic way.

The Heritage College has undergone transformational growth over the past 10 years, empowered by a $105 million gift from the Osteopathic Heritage Foundation. The college’s three academic campuses and prestigious health system partners across the state give OHIO a statewide footprint.

Virtual reality and game development program
Academics and Student Success Committee, 9 a.m. Friday, April 9

The Board will consider approval of a new degree program, the Bachelor of Science in communication in virtual reality and game development.

The program, including business and communications courses, will prepare students to become effective leaders, entrepreneurs, and creative problem-solvers in a wide variety of industries. The program will operate with existing facilities and staff, with an annual cohort of about 20 students.

Fee approvals
Resources, Facilities and Affordability committee, 9:30 a.m. Friday, April 9

The Board will consider approving course and broad-based fees, as well as graduate program tuition and fees, for Fiscal Year 2022.

Program fees for master’s programs in the College of Health Sciences and Professions, College of Business and the Voinovich School of Leadership and Public Affairs will be considered. In addition, broad-based fees including super single and super double room rates for Housing and Residence Life will be considered.

Capital projects
Resources, Facilities and Affordability committee, 9:30 a.m. Friday, April 9

The Board will consider budget amendments to ongoing projects, as well as several new projects.

The budget amendments are:

  • Clippinger Renovation: This would increase the budget for the Clippinger Renovation Phase 2 by $4.98 million, to a total of $38.6 million, and the Clippinger Renovation Phase 3 by $5.66 million to a total of $34.3 million. These changes are to cover recent increases in the construction market and cost estimate uncertainty. Phase 2 addresses deferred maintenance and programmatic needs in part of Clippinger, as well as the finishing the build-out of the third floor of the Chemistry Building. Phase 3 addresses deferred maintenance and programmatic needs in the remainder of Clippinger.
  • Alden Library: The chilled water tie-in budget would be reduced by $400,000 to a total of $850,000, while the budget for replacing two air handlers would increase by $400,00 to $1.4 million. The chilled water project will address failing cooling equipment in the library, while the air handlers will maintain the proper humidity and temperature necessary for a library environment.

New projects include:

  • Heating plant switch gear: This $8.8 million project would address critical deferred maintenance needs for equipment that is well beyond life expectancy in a major electrical distribution hub for campus.
  • Weld House demolition: This $2.5 million project would include demolition of Weld House and the catwalk and utilities connecting to Nelson. The space will be utilized as recreational green space.
  • Chubb Hall HVAC: This $2.2 million project includes a renovation of the HVAC systems in Chubb Hall.
  • Aquatic Center roof replacement: This $2 million project would replace the roof of the Aquatic Center, which is beyond repair and must be replaced to avoid further damage to the building.
  • Bush Airport apron rehabilitation: This $1.68 million project would reconstruct the existing ramp at the airport to meet current standards and handle heavier aircraft.
  • Shannon Hall HVAC (Eastern Campus): This $1.57 million project would modernize HVAC components in Shannon Hall.

Human Resources updates
Governance and Compensation Committee, 10:30 a.m. Friday, April 9

University Human Resources will present an update on significant compensation projects in the department, including the 2020 biennial equity review. The review is conducted by a third-party expert to ensure that administrative, classified and professional employee compensation has been determined on a non-discriminatory basis.

The Board will also receive an update on the compensation five-year market study, a large-scale review of benchmark job descriptions and market data. As part of the review, the pay structure was aged and widened, and several positions were moved into different pay grades to ensure alignment with market.

The full agenda for the April 8-9 Board of Trustees meetings can be found on the Trustees’ website. The board meetings will be streamed here on April 8 and here on April 9.

Safety Tips For Preparing Easter Ham and Eggs

Presented By McDonald’s, I’m Lovin’ It!

If you’re reading this, chances are, you enjoy eating ham. After a day of hunting for eggs and chasing the kids around the yard on Easter, it’s time for the family to enjoy that delicious ham they have been waiting for.

Things to Know about Proper Ham Preparation

Whether you are cooking a raw ham or preparing a ready-to eat ham product, follow these steps for a ham that is cooked to perfection.

  • Ham that is not ready-to-eat but has the appearance of ready-to-eat products will bear a statement on the label indicating the product needs cooking.
  • Ham that requires cooking before consumption or fresh, raw ham must reach an internal temperature of 145°F (with a three-minute rest time). Set the oven no lower than 325°F.
  • Cooked canned ham and cooked vacuum-packaged ham, both from federally inspected plants, can be eaten right out of the package. All of these along with spiral-cut cooked ham are safe to eat cold or can be warmed to an internal temperature of 145°F, as they are already fully cooked. For cooked hams that have been repackaged in any other location outside the processing plant, heat to an internal temperature of 165°F, measured with a food thermometer, before you serve it.

For more background information on the kinds, storage and cooking times for ham, visit Ham and Food Safety.

Egg Safety

Did you know that Salmonella bacteria can be found on both the outside and inside of eggs that appear to be normal? The larger the number of Salmonella present in the egg, the more likely the egg is to cause illness.

To enjoy eggs without the risk of getting sick:

  • Store eggs in the refrigerator.
  • Discard any cracked or dirty eggs.
  • Be sure to wash hands and any surfaces (counter tops, utensils or dishes) after contact with raw eggs.
  • Cook eggs thoroughly until both the yolk and white are firm. Cooking reduces the number of bacteria in an egg. Lightly cooked egg whites and yolks have both caused outbreaks of Salmonella infections.
  • Recipes containing eggs mixed with other foods should be cooked to an internal temperature of 160ºF.
  • Eat eggs promptly. Don’t keep them warm or at room temperature for more than two hours. DO NOT EAT hard-boiled eggs used for an egg hunt or as decorations if they have been at temperatures above 40ºF for more than two hours; discard them.

Consumers with questions about food safety can call the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline at 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) or chat live with a food safety specialist at AskKaren.gov, available from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday, in English or Spanish.

Child Abuse Prevention Month

Presented By Hometown-Motors, Inc.

Pictured are Julie Oates, former Executive Director of the Child Protection Center and Ross County Prosecuting Attorney Jeffrey Marks during the 2019 Pinwheels for Prevention planting ceremony. Dan Ramey/Litter Media

The month of April is Child Abuse Prevention Awareness Month, which began this observance in 1983.

Since then, April has been a time to acknowledge the importance of families and the community working together to prevent child abuse.

In the year 2015, the United States, along with the District of Columbus and Puerto Rico reported that an estimated 683,000 children were victims of child abuse or neglect and 1,670 children died as a result of abuse or neglect. 

The majority of child abuse cases stemmed from situations and conditions that are preventable when community programs and systems are engaged, supportive, and include services focusing on parental resilience, trauma history, nurturing and attachment, social connections, knowledge about parenting and child development, social and emotional competence of children, and concrete supports for parents.

The Child Protection Center, which is based in Chillicothe, will be conducting their annual observance at noon Tuesday, April 6th. This local event brings attention to the child abuse reports made each year in Ross County and includes the placing of pinwheels at the head of Yoctangee Park, numbering the local cases of abuse received in the previous year. 

In the 2019 observance, there were 1,592 reports of abuse from the year 2018.

The public is encouraged to attend. 

Mystery Dinner Theatre Returns To Adena Mansion & Gardens

Presented By Atomic Speedway

(CHILLICOTHE) – Adena Mansion and Gardens will once again become the place to hone your skills as a rookie crime solver in an entertaining atmosphere filled with great food and a mystery. This year’s mystery, “Attempted Murder” is an all-new original production written and directed by Delmar Burkitt.

The event will be September 10th-12th.

The grounds open at 5:15pm and the mystery will begin at 6:00pm. After you gather your clues, dinner will follow at approximately 7:00pm. Tickets are available at $50 per person for AMGS members and $55 for non-members. Admission includes both the mystery and the dinner. Prizes will be awarded each evening at the conclusion of the program.

Tickets will go on sale July 5, 2021 and can be purchased online at www.adenamansion.com/tickets, or in person at 847 Adena Road, Chillicothe. Seating is limited and reservations are required. Payment secures your reservation and may be made by cash, check or credit card.

Adena Mansion was the home of Ohio’s sixth governor, Thomas Worthington. Adena Mansion and Garden Society manages the site on behalf of the Ohio Historical Society. Adena is located at the south end of Adena Road, off Pleasant Valley Road, which is the first road off State Route 104, just north of the US 35 interchange at the north edge of Chillicothe.

For more information, please call 740-772-1500, email info@adenamansion.com, or visit www.adenamansion.com.

Virtual Listening Sessions Planned For Chillicothe VAMC

Presented By McDonald’s, I’m Lovin” It!

( CHILLICOTHE) — The Chillicothe VA Medical Center will hold a virtual listening session with stakeholders on April 12, 2021, at 8:30 a.m. to hear from Veterans and the communities VA serves.

This is one of 50 public virtual listening sessions across the country from March through June 2021 to hear from Veterans on how to design a health care system of the future and grow services for Veterans in a way that reinforces VA’s role as a leader in the U.S. health care system.

“We want to hear from Veterans and other stakeholders in the communities VA serves and understand their vision for VA health care,” said Dr. Kathy Berger, Medical Center Director.  “VA’s goal is to collaborate closely with Veterans and other stakeholders to build the best VA health care system that meets the needs of Veterans today and for generations to come.”

An equitable, high quality, Veteran-centered manner and develop a plan for investing in VA’s aging infrastructure.  The feedback will be used to develop the recommendations VA submits to the Asset and Infrastructure Review (AIR) Commission in January 2022.  The AIR Commission will also conduct public hearings as part of their review of VA’s recommendations before submitting its recommendations to the President and Congress for review and approval in 2023.

To register for the Chillicothe VA’s listening session, please visit https://www.va.gov/HEALTHPOLICYPLANNING/listening.asp. Contact the Public Affairs Office at 740-773-1141, extension 7080, with any questions. 

ODOT Weekly Road Reports

Presented By Atomic Speedway

The following construction projects are anticipated to affect highways in Ross County next week. All outlined work is weather permitting.

NEW* State Route 41 Slide Repair – S.R. 41 will be closed for two weeks between Tong Hollow Road and Falls Road starting April 5 at 7 AM. Traffic will be detoured via U.S. 50 and S.R. 28. Estimated completion: April 16 by 3:30 PM

NEW* State Route 28 Resurfacing – S.R. 28 will be reduced to one lane daily from 7 AM to 5 PM between S.R. 138 and Harper Station Road starting April 15. Traffic will be maintained using flaggers. Estimated completion: Summer 2021

Scioto Trails State Park Culvert Replacement – Scioto Trails Forest Road 5 will be closed for 60 days near the intersection with Stony Creek Road starting March 22. Estimated completion: Spring 2021

Tar Hollow State Park Slide Repair – Park Road 10 will be closed for 30 days in Tar Hollow State Park for a slide repair project starting March 15 at 7 AM. Estimated completion: May 14.

Ross County Guardrail Replacement – Various county roads will be reduced to one lane daily from 7 AM to 5 PM starting March 1. Traffic will be maintained using flaggers. Estimated completion: Summer 2021

U.S. 23 Slide Repair – U.S. 23 northbound will be reduced to one lane immediately south of S.R. 372 beginning at 7 AM on March 15. Estimated completion: Spring 2021
The following construction projects are anticipated to affect highways in Pike County next week. All outlined work is weather permitting.

U.S. 23 Signal Upgrade – U.S. 23 will be reduced to one lane in each direction daily from 7 AM to 5 PM on either side of the intersection with Second Street immediately south of the village of Waverly beginning March 24. Estimated completion: Summer 2021

S.R. 772 Slide Repair – S.R. 772 will be reduced to one, 13-foot lane between S.R. 124 and McKinney Road starting March 15 at 7 AM. Traffic will be maintained using temporary signals. Estimated completion: Summer 2021

Pike Lake State Park Resurfacing – Various park roads in Pike Lake State Park will be reduced to one lane daily from 7 AM – 5 PM starting March 15. Traffic will be maintained using flaggers. Estimated completion: Spring 2021

S.R. 32/Shyville Road Intersection Improvement – Beginning March 15, traffic lanes on S.R. 32 will be shifted in advance of construction of a new RCUT intersection design. Additional traffic impacts will be communicated as the project progresses. Estimated completion: Spring 2021
The following construction projects are anticipated to affect highways in Highland County next week. All outlined work is weather permitting.

NEW* S.R. 134 Culvert Replacement – S.R. 134 will be closed north of S.R. 138 in Buford for two days starting April 5 at 7:30 AM. Traffic will be detoured via S.R. 138 and S.R. 131. Estimated completion: April 6 by 3:30 PM

U.S. 62 Resurfacing – U.S. 62 will be reduced to one lane between the village of Hillsboro and Warlamount Road daily from 7 AM to 5 PM starting March 29. Traffic will be maintained using temporary signals. Estimated completion: Summer 2021
The following construction projects are anticipated to affect highways in Scioto County next week. All outlined work is weather permitting.

NEW* State Route 73 Culvert Replacement – S.R. 73 will be closed approximately 0.5 miles east of Arion Road on April 9 at 7 AM. Traffic will be detoured via S.R. 348 and S.R. 104. Estimated completion: April 9 by 7 PM

NEW* U.S. 52 Culvert replacements – This project will replace two culverts along U.S. 52 starting April 1. The first culvert is located east of Upper Twin Creek Road. The second culvert is located between Pond Run Road and Ziegler Lane. Construction for both culverts will occur simultaneously. For both locations, traffic on U.S. 52 will be maintained in one lane using temporary signals. Estimated completion: Summer 2021

NEW* Riverfront Multi-Use Path – This project will construct a multi-use path between Front Street and Offnere Street beginning April 1. Traffic on affected city streets and school roads will be maintained in one lane using flaggers as needed. Restrictions may occur daily between 7:30 AM and 5 PM. Estimated completion: Fall 2021

U.S. 23/Feurt Hill Road Intersection Improvement – Feurt Hill Road may be reduced to one lane as needed during construction, with traffic maintained using flaggers. Two lanes in each direction will be maintained on U.S. 23 throughout construction. Estimated completion: Fall 2021

State Route 823 routine maintenance – state Route 823 will be reduced to one, 14-foot lane in each direction daily from 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. for routine maintenance, pavement grinding, and other work as needed from March 30 to April 8. Estimated completion: April 8, by 6:30 p.m.
The following construction and maintenance projects are anticipated to affect highways in Adams County next week. All outlined work is weather permitting.

NEW* S.R. 32 Resurfacing – S.R. 32 will be reduced to one lane in each direction between Tranquility Pike and S.R. 73 starting April 5. Estimated completion: Fall 2021

District-wide Reflective Pavement Marker Installation – Currently working in Adams County. Beginning March 22, work will commence on various routes throughout the district from 7 AM to 5 PM daily. Traffic on two lane roadways will be maintained in one lane using flaggers. Traffic on four lane roadways will be maintained in at least one lane in each direction during work hours. Estimated completion: Summer 2021
The following construction projects are anticipated to affect highways in Brown County next week. All outlined work is weather permitting.

Village of Aberdeen Sidewalk Upgrades – This project will install new pedestrian facilities in the village of Aberdeen at the intersection of U.S. 52 and Elm Street starting March 29. Traffic on U.S. 52 will be maintained in one lane in each direction throughout construction, with minor traffic impacts possible. Estimated completion: Summer 2021
The following construction and maintenance projects are anticipated to affect highways in Lawrence County next week. All outlined work is weather permitting.

NEW* S.R. 378 Culvert Replacement – S.R. 378 will be closed for five days between Trace Creek – Marion Ridge Road and S.R. 141 starting at 7:30 AM on April 5. Traffic will be detoured via S.R. 141 and S.R. 217. Estimated completion: April 9 by 3 PM

NEW* S.R. 243/S.R. 378 Resurfacing – This project will resurface segments of both S.R. 243 and S.R. 378, as well as replace a culvert on S.R. 378. Traffic on the affected routes will be reduced to one lane daily from 7 AM to 5 PM beginning April 1. Traffic will be maintained using flaggers. Estimated completion: Fall 2021

NEW* U.S. 52 Bridge Repair and Maintenance – This project will perform various maintenance and repair work to several bridges along U.S. 52 starting April 1. Traffic will be maintained in one, 10-foot lane in each direction of U.S. 52 throughout construction. This project will include two, 14-day ramp closures at the U.S. 52/S.R. 93 interchange. During the ramp closures, traffic will be detoured via U.S. 52 and S.R. 141. Estimated completion: Fall 2021

State Route 7 Rockslide Remediation – S.R. 7 southbound between Buffalo Creek Road and Tallow Ridge Road is reduced to one, 12-foot lane. Additional traffic control measures may be necessary as construction progresses. Estimated completion: Spring 2021