Category Archives: Law Enforcement

Governor Delays Execution Date Of Ross County Murder Convict

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Ohio Governor Mike DeWine has delayed the scheduled execution of a Chillicothe man sentenced to death in the 1985 murder of 84-year-old Harold White Sr.

The governor granted the execution reprieve for Larry Landrum and two other death row inmates, due to ongoing problems involving the willingness of pharmaceutical suppliers to provide drugs to the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction (DRC), pursuant to DRC protocol, without endangering other Ohioans. 

Landrum was scheduled for execution on December 9, 2021, but that has been moved to October 15, 2024.

Landrum was convicted and sentenced to death in 1986. His 14-year-old accomplice was convicted in Ross County Juvenile Court and sent to the Ohio Youth Commission until he turned 21-years-old.

The other two reprieves by the governor were issued to:

  • Timothy L. Hoffner, who was scheduled to be executed on August 11, 2021.  The new date of execution has been moved to June 18, 2024. 
  • John David Stumpf, who was scheduled to be executed on September 15, 2021.  The new date of execution has been moved to August 13, 2024. 

Distracted Driver Enforcement Push Announced By OSP

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(UPDATED 4/6/21)
April is National Distracted Driving Awareness Month and the Chillicothe Post of the Ohio State Highway Patrol is reminding drivers to keep their eyes and their focus on the roadway while driving.

Over the last five years, 212 people lost their lives as a result of distracted driving. During this same timeframe, distracted driving led to 66,181 crashes in Ohio. Statistics show that male drivers accounted for 55 percent of all distracted driving crashes and 64 percent of the related fatal crashes. Nearly one in three distracted drivers were between the ages of 16 and 24 years old. Because drivers are reluctant to admit to distracted driving, the actual number of distracted driving crashes, injuries and deaths are believed to be significantly higher.

“Distracted driving must become as culturally unacceptable as impaired driving is today. They’re equally avoidable and equally dangerous,” said Governor Mike DeWine. “Allowing something to take your focus off the roadway is irresponsible and the consequences can be troubling for Ohio families.”

On October 29, 2018, Ohio passed House Bill 95, a law which broadened what is considered distracted driving and increased the fine if it was a contributing factor to the commission of the driving violation.

“When you take your eyes off the road – even for just a few seconds – you are putting your life and the lives of others in danger,” Lt. Karwatske, Commander of the Chillicothe Post said. “There is nothing more important than the safety of yourself, your passengers and other motorists – everything else can wait.”

Distracted driving is any non-driving activity with the potential to distract a person from the primary task of driving and increase the risk of crashing. Distractions can be visual, taking eyes off of the road; manual, taking hands off the wheel; or cognitive, taking the mind off driving. Texting while driving is an example that results in all three types of distraction. Sending or receiving a text message takes a driver’s eyes off the road for an average of 4.6 seconds, the equivalent of driving the length of an entire football field when traveling at 55 mph.

As a reminder, Ohio law bans all electronic wireless communication device usage for drivers under 18. Texting while driving is illegal for all drivers and is a secondary offense for adults 18 and above.

(ORIGINATED 4/3/21)

(COLUMBUS) – The Ohio State Highway Patrol is teaming up with other members of the 6-State Trooper Project to focus on the enforcement of distracted driving laws. The push begins April 5th and runs through April 12th.

The high-visibility enforcement will also include state police agencies out of Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Pennsylvania and West Virginia.

Between 2016 and 2020, distracted driving resulted in 212 deaths on Ohio’s roadways. Sending or receiving a text message takes a driver’s eyes off the road for an average of 4.6 seconds, the equivalent of driving the length of an entire football field when traveling at 55 mph.

“By driving distracted, you are putting yourself and the lives of others at risk,” said Colonel Richard S. Fambro. “Every time someone takes their eyes off the road – even for just a split second, its consequences can be devastating.”

On October 29, 2018, Ohio passed House Bill 95, a law which broadened what is considered distracted driving and increased the fine if it was a contributing factor to the commission of the driving violation.

Distracted driving is any non-driving activity with the potential to distract a person from the primary task of driving and increase the risk of crashing. Distractions can be visual, taking eyes off of the road; manual, taking hands off the wheel; or cognitive, taking the mind off driving. Texting while driving is an example that results in all three types of distraction.

The 6-State Trooper Project is a multi-state law enforcement partnership aimed at providing combined and coordinated law enforcement and security services in the areas of highway safety, criminal patrol and intelligence sharing.

Open House Date Set For Public To See New Fayette County Jail

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You can also watch our Litter Media video tour taken on March 17th.

An open house date has been set for the community to view the inside of the new Fayette County Jail.

Sheriff Vernon Stanforth and the Fayette County Commissioners will host a ribbon cutting at the new Fayette County Sheriff’s Office & Jail on Friday, April 2nd at 11am.

Following the ribbon cutting, an open house of the jail facility will be held from noon until 5pm.

Inmates could be moved to the new complex within a few weeks.

New Fayette County Jail Construction Nears Completion

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Fayette County is on the verge of opening a new jail and sheriff administrative offices as the finishing touches are being put on a new $24 million construction project on Robinson Road on the outskirts of Washington Court House. 


Fayette County Sheriff Vernon Stanforth said; “I always contend we have had a secure building, but there are issues we cannot address in an 1884 building.” Over the years, the current jail had failed dozens of state standards and was in danger of being shut down by the state. That is among the reasons Sheriff Stanforth is happy to see the new building almost ready to open for inmates.


“By the square footage that’s dictated by the State of Ohio, we can only have 24 in the (current) jail. Our population is typically 50. We’ve had as many as 93 in that facility and we’re talking about packed. They (inmates) take turns sleeping, (but) we’ve tried to stay away from that.”

“In the new facility, we are going to have 120 beds. We are hoping with the help of the courts, that will not be maxed out.”


Sheriff Stanforth was scheduled to lead a tour of the new facility for the judges of Fayette County Wednesday, immediately after Litter Media’s cameras were allowed into the new site for a tour led by Sheriff Stanforth.


The voters of Fayette County got the ball rolling on the project when they approved one of the first dual ballot issues for a new law complex. Stanforth says voters approved jail construction and its operation- all with one levy. 


The county was also able to get a U.S. Department of Agriculture loan for $20 million, with Fayette County putting in another $2 million to $3 million from their general fund for a project that will max-out at approximately $24 million. 

Stanforth says the levy was designed to pay back the loan over 40 years. But, the Fayette County Commissioners recently renegotiated the federal loan, which will save on the interest percentage of the loan and shave off approximately 10 years on the payback of that loan. 


The sheriff says he’s hopeful the commissioners will be able to negotiate further with the USDA, which could lead to even more savings for Fayette County in the payback of the loan. 

On the lifespan of the new corrections center, Stanforth says there is really no way to be able to gauge that. “No one will ever guarantee the life of a building over 25 to 30 years- that’s industry standard for any building. The current building (jail) has outlived its life-cycle by about 100 years. This building, we hope, will last longer than 30 years.” 


Changes in philosophical methods for corrections could also have a bearing on the future lifespan of the new jail, according to Sheriff Stanforth. 

“It doesn’t take too much imagination to look at the technology in the last 20, even 10 years and the same thing will happen to this facility. Technology will move on, our corrections standards based on community standards will migrate and change as well over the next 20 years so they may have less people incarcerated.” 


Stanforth continued; “The mood may change and we may want more people incarcerated. And this design is fixed so that another generation could come in and build a replicate building right beside it, using the same blueprints that could house over 200 inmates. And still use the same common utility hallway we showed you earlier that would have the same laundry, kitchen and loading area that would be used for both facilities- if that would ever come about it”.


Inmates could be moved to the new Fayette County Jail within the next month, once all security checks have been completed.

The view of the cell blocks from the Central Command Center of the new Fayette County Jail. Dan Ramey/Litter Media
The current Fayette County Jail on West Market Street in Washington CH was built in 1884. Dan Ramey/Litter Media