Bishop Flaget Seeks Input About Restarting A Catholic High School in Chillicothe

Article presented by Atomic Speedway

(Chillicothe) – Bishop Flaget Catholic School’s Facebook page is reporting that discussions are underway about gauging the public interest in a restart of Bishop Flaget High School.

“We just had our first discussion of a new Catholic high school in Chillicothe!  We need your input!  Please complete our survey and share with anyone else who wants to chime in!  We need everyone’s thoughts in order to create the best opportunity for Catholic education beyond 8th grade in our community!”

The purpose of this survey is to collect data to begin the discussion of forming and operating a Catholic high school on the Bishop Flaget Catholic School campus at 570 Parsons Avenue in Chillicothe, Ohio. 

The building, which was built as a high school in 1962 and closed in 1986, currently houses students in preschool through 8th grade. 

The Bishop Flaget Facebook survey also stated- “Discussion is just beginning, but we would like to be able to put together a multi-faceted plan which addresses the educational and spiritual needs of our community as well as surrounding communities. It is our goal to present a viable plan to the Diocese of Columbus within the 2022-2023 school year which would enable us to enroll our first 9th grade students for the 2023-2024 school year.” 

CLICK HERE TO FIND THE BISHOP FLAGET SURVEY

EF1 Tornado Confirmed In June 13th Storm

Article presented by Classic Brands

(File photo courtesy of WikiMedia Commons)

(NWS) – The National Weather Service in Wilmington OH has confirmed an EF1 tornado in Pike County, Ohio. This tornado occurred on June 13th, 2022.

Based on aerial imagery provided by the Aviation Section of the Ohio State Highway Patrol and the Ohio Emergency Management Agency, wind damage seen south of the Latham Area along Dry Bone Road, State Route 124, and Grassy Fork Road was likely caused by a brief tornado. A path of enhanced damage from west of Dry Bone Road to east of Grassy Fork Road is noted in the aerial imagery indicative of this weak tornado. This corridor of damage is embedded within a much larger field of wind damage affecting large swaths of Pike County in general.

The more concentrated corridor of damage does have a convergent nature to the felled trees, rather defined lateral bounds, and episodes of debris thrown upwind. Most notably, a garage which was heavily damaged on Grassy Fork Road has some of its debris thrown upwind of storm motion. Several corridors of extensive tree damage between Grassy Fork Road and State Route 124 have a clear convergent pattern in the felled trees. Damage in these areas is consistent with wind speeds around 90 mph. The tornado likely lifted in the hills east of Grassy Fork Road, but the line of storms and significant storm outflow continued to produce widespread straight line wind damage in excess of 70 mph across much of Pike County, including some localized areas possible.

Pickaway Fair Queen & King Contestants Preview

Article presented by Chillicothe VAMC

(Circleville) – The Pickaway County Junior Fair kicks off this weekend and one of the big events Sunday night is the queen and king contestant at the fairground’s amphitheater. 

Canidates for the queen contest are Alexis Patterson, Alex Pontius, Makayla Robinson, Melina Roush-Kapczewski, Morgan Griffith, Kayla Kolesar, Samantha Mayhew,  Lillianna Stafford. Delaney Sark, and Kiera Scott.

King candidates are Ehan Arnett and Austin Eitel.

Morgan Griffith is the 17-year-old daughter of Melissa and Edward Griffith of Circleville. She is a 4-year member of the Saddle & Sirloin 4-H club where she has served as President, Vice President, and Health & Safety officer. Morgan is an 8 year member of the Girl Scouts, and a one year member of FCCLA. She is a recent graduate of Circleville High School and plans to attend the University of Finley this fall with a major in Pre-Vet and Equine Studies. 

Samantha Mayhew is an 11 year member of the Buttons & Bowls 4-H club where she has served as the President, News Reporter, Historian, and Safety Officer. She is a 2 year member of the Logan Elm FFA where she has served as the Chapter Historian and Treasurer. Samantha has been a 4-H camp counselor, served 2 years on the Junior Fair Board, volunteers with the Pickaway County Harness Racing program, and is a member of the FFA Equine Management and Vet Science teams. Samantha is the 16-year-old daughter of Regina and Sean Mayhugh of Circleville. She will be a junior at Logan Elm High School this fall.

Kayla Kolesar is the 16-year-old daughter of Bhrena Kolesar and Shawn Zimmerman of Ashville. Kayla is a 7 year member of the Madison Livewires 4-H club where she has served as the President, Treasurer, and Health & Safety Officer. Kayla will be a Senior at Teays Valley High School this fall. She hopes to attend college to major in the medical field.

Alexis Patterson is 17 year old daughter of Matt and Jennifer Kinney of Circleville and Chase and Christina Patterson of Williamsport. Alexis is a 7 year member of the Saltcreek Livestock 4-H club where she has served as the Secretary, Treasurer, Vice President, and President. She is a member of the Junior Fair Board and serves on the Showman of Showmen committee. Alexis enjoys spending time with family, photography and her church youth group. Alexis will be a senior at Circleville High School this fall.

Alex Pontius is the 18-year-old daughter of Amy Troxel and Barry Pontius of Williamsport. She is a 9 year member of 4-H where she has served as the News Reporter, Treasurer, Health Officer and Vice President in the Scioto Darby Thundering Hooves 4-H club. Alex is a member of the Pickaway County Junior Fair Board and currently serves on the Cloverbud committee. Alex is a 2022 graduate of Westfall High School. This fall she will attend Shawnee State University with a major in Game Simulation Arts and minor in music.

Delaney Sark is a 3 year member of the Teays Valley FFA and a 9 year member of the Wild Wild West 4-H club where she has served as the Historian, Rec Leader, Vice President. She is a 3 year member of the Pickaway County Junior Fair Board where she serves on the Showman of Showmen committee. Delany is the 16-year-old daughter of Stacey and Ryan Sark of Orient. She will be a senior at Teays Valley High School this fall.

Makayla Robinson is a 10 year member of the Squeaks & Squeals 4-H club where she has served as the Historian, Reporter, and Secretary, and a 4 year member of the Teays Valley FFA where she has served as the Present and Student Advisor. Makayla is a member and officer in the Junior Fair Board. Makayla is a recent graduate of Teays Valley High School and will attending the Ohio State University majoring in Agriscience Education and Animal Science. Makayla is the 17-year-old daughter of Candace Robinson.

Lillianna Stafford is the 16-year-old daughter of Max and Amy Stafford of Circleville. Lillianna is an 8 year member of the Jackson Livestock 4-H club where she has served as the President, Vice President, Secretary and News Reporter. Lillianna is a 2 year member of the Junior Fair Board and currently serves on the Cloverbud committee. She will be a senior at Circleville High School.

Melina Roush-Kapczewski is the 16-year-old daughter of Camille and Michael Kapczewski of Orient. Melina is a 3 year member of the Lucky Clovers 4-H club, and a 7 year member of the Girl Scouts. In 4-H she has held the offices of Treasurer and News Reporter. Melina will be a senior this fall at Bishop Ready High School.

Kiera Scott is a 6 year member of the Scioto Scrappin’ & More 4-H club where she has served as the Vice President, Treasurer, Historian, and New Reporter, and a 3 year member of the Teays Valley FFA where she has been elected President and Sentinel. Kiera is a member of the Junior Fair Board and a 4-H camp counselor. Kiera is the 17 year old daughter of Melissa Scott of Ashville. She will be a senior this fall.

Ehan Arnett is the 16-year-old son of Josh and Vanessa Arnett of Orient. He will be a senior at Westfall High School. Ehan has been a member of 4-H for 9 years where he has served as the Vice President, Historian and Health & Safety Officer in the Future Farmers of Monroe 4-H club. Ehan is a 2 year member of the Pickaway County Junior Fair Board where he has been active with the Clover and T-Shirt committees.

Austin Eitel is the 18-year-old son of Brandon and Shauna Eitel of Mt. Sterling. Austin is a 2 year member of Westfall FFA and a 3 year member of the Future Farmers of Monroe 4-H club. Austin is serving his third year on the Pickaway County Junior Fair Board where he is a member of the Events committee. Austin is a recent graduate of Westfall High School and Pickaway Ross Career and Technology Center, and is employed by Transport Specialists Inc. in Hilliard, Ohio.

Severe Weather Damage Brings Out Scammers & Fake Charities

Article Presented By Horizon Connects

(Columbus) — With the warm-weather storm season heating up, Attorney General Dave Yost is reminding Ohioans to watch out for home-repair scammers and fake charities soliciting donations on behalf of individuals affected by storms.

“Shady storm chasers make my blood boil – they look to severe weather watches and warnings to try to make a quick buck,” Yost said. “And bogus charities come from the same swamp. Their goal is to rip off people who are trying to help.

“My office works hard to show Ohioans how to spot these swindlers.”

Unscrupulous contractors travel to storm-damaged communities to offer their services to homeowners, but then perform shoddy work or no work at all. In many cases, they go door to door, claiming that they can complete the work immediately. 

The Attorney General’s Office advises consumers to follow these steps to avoid home-repair scams:

  • Research the business. Ask for identification from the company representative; note the person’s name, address and phone number; and be cautious of any contractor who won’t provide this information. Check out the company’s reputation with the Ohio Attorney General’s Office and the Better Business Bureau. You can also search for possible previous lawsuits filed by the attorney general’s Consumer Protection Section.
  • Get multiple written estimates. Obtaining at least three written estimates from three distinct contractors could help you weed out bad apples. Beware of contractors that have only a few projects for you to review.
  • Don’t make large payments in advance. Instead, pay in increments – for example, a third at the beginning of the job, a third after half of the work is completed to your satisfaction, and the final third when the job is completed.
  • Get all promises in writing. Insist on a written contract detailing the costs, the work to be done, the starting and end dates, and any verbal promises made by the contractor. The contract should also note whether subcontractors will be used and whether the contractor has or will obtain the necessary licenses and permits. Insist on being provided a copy of every document you sign or initial.
  • Understand your cancellation rights. If the contract resulted from a door-to-door sale, you generally have three days to cancel the contract, according to Ohio’s Home Solicitation Sales Act. The seller should give you written notice of these rights.
  • Consider paying with a credit card. Paying with a credit card, as opposed to paying in cash, generally gives you greater protections to dispute unauthorized charges. 

When it comes to making charitable donations, donors should research charities and ask questions. Donors should follow these steps to ensure that gifts are used as intended:

  • Visit the attorney general’s Research Charities webpage to see whether charities have complied with registration requirements, to connect with charity watchdog organizations and to learn what others say about the group. News articles and other postings can also provide useful details about groups, board members and key employees.
  • Request to view 990 forms, which most tax-exempt groups must file with the Internal Revenue Service. These forms describe where organizations get their funding and how they spend it.
  • Support familiar, established organizations with a strong track record of success and experience in dealing with natural disasters. Tragedies can sometimes prompt the creation of new charities that may or may not have the needed expertise to provide meaningful relief or run a charity effectively.
  • Talk with friends and family about unfamiliar solicitations. Have they heard of the group? Do they know of anyone who has been assisted by it?

Ohioans who suspect unfair sales practices or misuse of charitable resources should contact the Ohio Attorney General’s Office at www.OhioProtects.orgCharitable.OhioAGO.gov or 800-282-0515.